The UK’s first heart pump to start clinical trials in 2018

2 months ago Christopher 0

Medicine and science are constantly moving forward; now, the UKs first ever artificial heart pump is one step closer to being a reality for patients.

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The pump, which has been developed by Calon Cardio, will be implanted into a patients failing heart to pump blood around the body. The pump works independently and is expected to last for around 10 years. This is a huge step forward for anyone who has heart issues and could make life easier for tens of thousands of people across the world.

Changing the lives of many

The life-changing pump was first developed at Swansea Universitys Institute of Life Science, with clinical trials scheduled to begin in 2018. These trials are estimated to take around two years and the plan is for the pump to be released immediately afterwards.

While other heart pumps have existed for years, the majority of these break up red or white blood cells or damage proteins in the blood. This means the pumps increase the risk of other health problems, but thankfully this pump seems to be problem-free. It is the most advanced of its kind and can treat blood that flows through it gently, meaning there is no damage to the blood. The pump should come with very few adverse effects, which is ideal for patients who are very weak or very ill.

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Benefits

One of the main benefits of this heart pump is that patients can enjoy a normal quality of life without constant trips to the hospital. According to Healthfinch, one of the easiest ways to make your patients happier is to provide them with an efficient service. This heart pump will be extremely efficient, as patients do not need to go back to the hospital once it has been placed in their heart. This will vastly improve the lives of patients with weak hearts.

If you are interested in learning more about patient recruitment services, contact a research organisation such as http://www.richmondpharmacology.com/patient-recruitment.php.

The pump will be placed directly into the hearts of patients; from there, it will be driven by an embedded electric monitor. The user will need to wear a battery pack for the device to work; however, this is no different to the majority of heart pumps that are already available.